June 24 2015 02:25 PM

New indie drama from David Gordon Green leads our rundown of movies screening around town

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Manglehorn

David Gordon Green's Manglehorn drifts aimlessly wherever it pleases, like a ship with no need for a sail. It's the kind of movie that challenges our understanding of narrative by disavowing all of the rules we've been programmed to expect. This makes for a messy, bonkers experience, one that parallels the rambling inner conflict of its lead.

Gruff and grumpy, Al Pacino stars as A.J. Manglehorn, a droopy locksmith living alone in a rural Texas town. He owns a quaint brick-and-mortar operation but spends much of his time making house calls to stranded motorists who've locked themselves out of their car. Much of Manglehorn's conflict stems from his pining for a long lost love named Clara, a woman who's never seen but always felt.

Regret dominates the characters' perspective, but Green doesn't let him descend into morose apathy. Many of the aesthetic choices (slow motion, super imposition, drowsy music cues) lovingly complement the way Manglehorn has normalized a false version of unrequited love. This is more complicated a view than your normal male pity party.

Some may resist Manglehorn's odd sensibilities and tonal shifts; at one point a quiet walk through the park bleeds into a tracking shot covering a massive car accident littered with smashed watermelons. Green evokes the absurdity and chaos of a similarly memorable scene in Jean-Luc Godard's Weekend.

This feels lovingly free from your run-of-the-mill indie fare, singular in tone and scope. Pacino's oddly affecting performance is one of his best in a decade, with Green giving the legendary actor room to create a character mired in numbing discomfort.

Manglehorn, which opens Friday, June 26, at the Digital Gym Cinema, is the rare film that treats the dilemmas of older people with respect, never shying away from the fact that they can be equally as conflicted and tormented as pubescent teenagers.


Opening

A Little Chaos: During the reign of King Louis XIV, two landscape artists fall in love while designing portions of Versailles. Starring Kate Winslet, Alan Rickman, Stanley Tucci, and Matthias Schoenaerts.

Escobar: Paradise Lost: Benicio del Toro stars as drug kingpin Pablo Escobar, whose young niece becomes romantically entangled with an American surfer played by Josh Hutcherson (The Hunger Games).

Fresh Dressed: Hip-hop and fashion collide in this pop culture documentary that celebrates the merging of art forms and culture. Screens through Thursday, July 2, at the Digital Gym Cinema in North Park

Infinitely Polar Bear: Mark Ruffalo plays a manic-depressive father who finally decides to get his act together and begin raising his two spirited daughters.

Manglehorn: Al Pacino plays an elderly locksmith who roams around his rural Texas town reminiscing about the love of his life who left him decades before. Screens through Thursday, July 2, at the Digital Gym Cinema in North Park.

Max: After helping U.S. Marines in Afghanistan, a dog returns to his handler's family after suffering a traumatic experience.

Ted 2: The thunder buddies return for another dose of vulgarity, boozing, and hilarity.

The Connection: Jean Dujardin stars as a French police officer who spends years trying to track and arrest one of the country's most notorious drug traffickers.

The Overnight: A family new to Los Angeles gets a wild introduction during a "play date" with another family.

One Time Only 

Saboteur: Alfred Hitchcock's 1942 thriller finds an aircraft factory worker on the run after being wrongly accused of murder and arson. Screens at 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, June 25 and 26, at Cinema Under the Stars in Mission Hills.

Two Bits: Directed by James Foley, this drama takes place in South Philadelphia circa 1933, where a young boy lives with his widowed mother and grouchy grandpa (played by Al Pacino). Screens at 7 p.m. Friday, June 26, at The Lafayette Hotel in North Park. 

The Breakfast Club: John Hughes deconstructs the high school hierarchy by throwing five diverse students into a room and forcing them to see each other for the first time. Screens at 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, June 27 and 28 at Cinema Under the Stars in Mission Hills. 

The Fountain: Darren Aronofsky directs this wildly imaginative Sci-fi film about a scientist (Hugh Jackman) attempting to find a cure for his cancer-stricken wife. Screens at 7 p.m. Monday, June 29, at the Digital Gym Cinema in North Park.

Henry V: Laurence Olivier's adaptation of Shakespeare's play about the English king who wanted to conquer France. Screens at 8:15 p.m. Monday, June 29, at The Old Globe Theatre in Balboa Park. 

Handsome Harry: A longtime Navy man breaks the code of silence about a crime after carrying out the last wish of a dying shipmate. Screens at 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 29 at the San Diego Central Library in East Village. 

Fading Gigolo: Hilarity ensues when Woody Allen convinces John Turturro to become a gigolo for older, unsatisfied women. Screens at 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 30, at the Point Loma / Hervey Branch Library.

Top Gun: Take me to bed or lose me forever. Screens at 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 1, at The Pearl Hotel in Point Loma. 

Now Playing

Dope: Malcolm escapes his tough neighborhood by attending an underground party that leads him and his friends on a Los Angeles adventure. 

Every Last Child: Tom Roberts' documentary addresses the current health crisis in Pakistan where children are contracting polio at an alarming rate. Opens Friday, June 19, at the Reading Gaslamp Cinemas. 

Hunting Elephants: After a bullied young teen reconnects with his grandfather and uncle, the trio decides to solve their financial problems by robbing a bank. Opens Friday, June 19, at AMC Mission Valley Cinemas. 

Inside Out: Pixar goes inside the mind of a twelve-year-old girl and finds something ethereal, resonant and powerful. 

La Sapienza: The marvels of European architecture provide the backdrop for this drama about an older couple trying to salvage their marriage. Screens through Thursday, June 25, at the Digital Gym Cinema in North Park.

Llévate Mis Amores: This documentary offers an intense look at the plight of those crossing the U.S. / Mexico border by train, and the people who try to make their journey slightly less difficult. Screens through Thursday, June 25, at the Digital Gym Cinema in North Park. 

Love at First Fight: Two French twentysomethings meet, fight and fall in love in this Cannes Film Festival award-winner. Screens through Thursday, June 25, at the Digital Gym Cinema in North Park. 

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl: The title really says it all. Get ready for some precious cinephile self-reflection. 

The Wolfpack: Sequestered in an expansive and dank apartment, the Angulo children learn about the world from their massive movie collection in Crystal Moselle's documentary.  

Jurassic World: Velociraptors in mirror are closer than they appear. 

Live from New York: This documentary goes behind the scenes of an American television institution: Saturday Night Live

Results: Andrew Bujalski's sweetly offbeat romantic comedy features Guy Pearce and Cobie Smulders as personal trainers whose relationship gets complicated after a new client (Kevin Corrigan) comes into the picture. 

Entourage: The popular HBO show about a movie star and his childhood friends making it big in Hollywood gets the big-screen treatment. 

Testament of Youth: Vera Brittain's WWI memoir is told from the perspective of a woman seeing the futility of war for the first time. 

Aloft: A conflicted single mother turned mystic must come to grips with the decisions she makes that will affect her children well into the future.  

Insidious: Chapter 3: Round three in the ongoing battle between white suburbia and the supernatural hereafter. Go! 

Love & Mercy: Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys gets the biopic treatment in a story that covers pivotal moments in the 1960s and 1980s. Starring Paul Dano and John Cusack.

Spy: Melissa McCarthy steps out from behind the desk and into the field in this spy comedy from director Paul Feig (Bridesmaids). 

When Marnie Was There: The latest animation from the legendary Studio Ghibli tells the story of a shy young girl who meets the young occupant of a mysterious mansion.

Aloha: Cameron Crowe tries to resuscitate his career with this long-delayed (not a good sign) drama about a military man based in Hawaii trying to rediscover love. 

San Andreas: "What a disaster."
—Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson.

In the Name of My Daughter: André Téchiné's melodrama is set in the South of France and follows the sordid relationships of a casino owner (Catherine Deneuve) and her daughter. 

Poltergeist: In this remake, the youngest daughter of a suburban family is captured by ghosts, leaving her family scrambling for ways to rescue her. 

Tomorrowland: George Clooney and Britt Robertson star in Brad Bird's space adventure about a young girl who finds a ring that opens up an alternate universe. 

Saint Laurent: A strange and beguiling biopic about the famous French fashion designer, Yves Saint Laurent, portrayed with unflinching vulnerability by Gaspard Ulliel. Bertrand Bonello directs.

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Jumped Out the Window and Disappeared: An elderly man escapes his nursing home immediately before his 100th birthday hoping to rekindle his sense of adventure.

Felix and Meira: Two lost souls attempt to find a romantic connection despite the obstacles presented by the neighborhood they inhabit. 

Saint Laurent: A strange and beguiling biopic about the famous French fashion designer, Yves Saint Laurent, portrayed with unflinching vulnerability by Gaspard Ulliel. Bertrand Bonello directs.

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Jumped Out the Window and Disappeared: An elderly man escapes his nursing home immediately before his 100th birthday hoping to rekindle his sense of adventure.

Felix and Meira: Two lost souls attempt to find a romantic connection despite the obstacles presented by the neighborhood they inhabit. 

Mad Max: Fury Road: George Miller's infamous policeman-turned-road-warrior returns to the big screen in what looks like one long bonkers chase through a dystopic desert. Tom Hardy reprises the role made famous by Mel Gibson.

About Elly: While on a picnic in the north of Iran, a kindergarten teacher disappears, leaving her friends distraught with panic. From director Asghar Farhadi (A Separation).  

Far From the Madding Crowd: Carey Mulligan and Matthias Schoenaerts star in Thomas Vinterberg's adaptation of Thomas Hardy's sweeping romance about a fiercely independent woman who struggles to choose between three suitors. 

Black Souls: Based on Gioacchini Criaco's novel of the same name, this gripping mafia tale explores the tension and conflict between three brothers fighting for control of an Italian crime family. 

Noble: A feature film based on the true story of Christina Noble, an Irish children's rights campaigner who traveled to Vietnam to make a difference. 

Hot Pursuit: An uptight cop played by Reese Witherspoon tries to protect the vivacious widow of a Mexican drug boss while being pursued through Texas by a collective of bad guys.. 

Welcome to Me: A psychotic woman (Kristen Wiig) wins the lottery and decides to stop taking her meds and creates her own talk show.

The D Train: Jack Black and James Marsden are quite a pair in this dark comedy about the head of a high school reunion committee who travels to Los Angeles, hoping to convince the most popular guy from his graduating class to attend the event. 

Avengers: Age of Ultron: The brood of Marvel superheroes are back to battle the nefarious Ultron, who has plans to take over the world.  

Clouds of Sils Maria: A middle-aged actress decides to star in a reboot of the play that made her famous 20 years before. Starring Juliette Binoche, Kristin Stewart and Chloë Grace-Moretz. 

Dior and I: Documentary that takes you behind the scenes of the storied world of the Christian Dior fashion house. 

Ex Machina: Set in the near future, Alex Garland's sci-fi film tells the story of an Internet mogul who convinces one of his employees to conduct a Turing test on his newest A.I. creation.  

Little Boy: With his father away in WW II, a young boy goes to great lengths to restore stability to his family. 

The Age of Adaline: Rendered ageless after a fateful accident, a young woman born at the turn of the 20th century lives a lonely life of immortality until she finally meets a stranger who may be worth dying for. 

The Road to Juarez: An ex-con recruits his friends to pull off a daring heist against a powerful Mexican drug cartel. 

The Water Diviner: After the battle of Gallipoli, an Australian man travels to Turkey hoping to locate his three missing sons. 

Desert Dancer: An ambitious young man risks everything to start a new dance company despite the politically volatile climate of his home country of Iran. 

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter: A young Japanese woman travels to America searching for a briefcase full of cash that was hidden in the snow during 1996's Fargo

Lambert and Stamp: This documentary looks at the unlikely partnership between two aspiring filmmakers who ended up producing one of the greatest rock bands in history: The Who. 

Monkey Kingdom: A documentary about one newborn monkey and its mother attempting to survive the social hierarchy of the Temple Troop, a group of monkeys who live in a series of ruins deep in the jungles of South Asia. 

True Story: James Franco stars as a murder suspect who has stolen the identity of a disgraced New York Times reporter played by Jonah Hill. Weird casting. 

Unfriended: The Facebook horror film you knew was coming but didn't think would be here quite this soon. 

Havana Curveball: A young and enthusiastic teenager decides to create a grand plan of supplying Cuba with baseballs after being inspired by the holy words associated with his Bar Mitzvah. 

Kill Me Three Times: After a botched assignment, a professional hitman  played by Simon Pegg gets wrapped up in three different tales of murder, blackmail and revenge.

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