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Glenn Heath Jr.

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Image courtesy of Paolo Zuñiga

'Lacustre,' which screens Sunday, Aug. 25, is most certainty a film at ease, but only tonally. Underneath the surface there’s a level of probing anxiety reacting against feelings of helplessness. Read more

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Benjamín Naishtat’s effectively droll 'Rojo' takes place in Argentina during the months leading up to the 1976 coup that ousted then president Isabel Martínez de Perón. Read more

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An ambitious and angry genre film, The Nightingale (opening Friday, Aug. 16) is awash in confrontational iconography that reveals the high crimes of colonialist histories traditionally written by white men. Read more

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This quietly devastating document is so powerful precisely because it avoids being sensational or overtly critical. Read more

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Gripping and sobering, Piranhas (opening Friday, Aug. 9) examines how violent turnover morphs into a natural extension of our base desires for wealth and respect. Read more

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Venomous snakes are the literal manifestation of toxic blind faith in the morose new indie drama Them That Follow. Read more

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Under these trying circumstances, At War is most interesting when it asks this question: Can compromise really be achieved when money supersedes people? Read more

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'David Crosby: Remember My Name' opens with the famous rock musician lamenting all the bad decisions he’s made over his nearly five decades in show business. Read more

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Tarantino has always been particularly fond of history’s bit players; the ones living in between fame and infamy. In the end, they are no less prone to embracing moments of selfishness, violence and brutality. Read more

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The right wing conspiracy theorists in Sword of Trust are so ridiculous that their mere existence would be questioned in any other time period. Read more

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Leonard Cohen’s iconic deep voice cemented him as the masculine musical poet of the early 1970s. Read more

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Lulu Wang’s 'The Farewell', a passion project based on her own life experiences, stands out against the backdrop of this particularly insufferable blockbuster season. Read more

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It’s unclear exactly what The Art of Self-Defense (opening Friday, July 19) is trying to say about the hierarchies of toxic masculinity other than they are bad and cyclical. Read more

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Reygadas is known for intimately challenging and visually striking films (Silent Light and Post Tenebras Lux, for example) that use duration to expand upon the nuances of emotional disconnections. Read more

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The acclaimed writer of Beloved and Nobel Prize winner has been defying the traditions fortified by a largely male literary world ever since her debut novel, The Bluest Eye, was published in 1970. Read more

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All of it points to a filmmaker who thinks very highly of himself, thanks in no small part to the many critics (some of whom are glorified publicists) that have dubbed him the second coming of Stanley Kubrick. Read more

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Tracy Edwards was tired of being told no when she finally decided to recruit an all-women sailing team for the 1989-90 Whitbread Round the World Race. Read more

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Image courtesy of The Film Arcade

Being Frank lazily plays with the idea of Philip using Frank’s secret as leverage, but the characters aren’t mean-spirited enough to carry this thread through to its naturally destructive conclusion. Read more

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Image courtesy of Janus Films

One of the seminal American documentaries on sexuality and race, Paris is Burning embeds itself in the world of competitive “balls,” elaborate drag competitions staged by Harlem’s LGBTQ community in the late 1980s. Read more

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Thematic correlations between property and dignity are also highly relevant to The Last Black Man in San Francisco, a lovely, if not precious, indie where housing inequality and gentrification have pushed out communities of color. Read more

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